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« NOT watching the Oval Office Gulf Speech: See no evil, hear no evil, tweet no evil? | Main | Creeping socialism has transmogrified into galloping statism »

June 16, 2010

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I've never been a fan of his art. Now let me stop right here and say I am NOT an art snob. I like all kinds of cheesy stuff that real "arteests" would never dream of even looking at... but there has always been something about his paintings that doesn't work for me. I just can't quite put my finger on it.

Obviously with all the money he made from his work, I am not in the majority but there it is. I guess it does appeal to many people though - I was always surprised about that. Heh. Personally I'd rather look at the pic of Tiny and Baby.

I feel the same way about Mort Kunsler, the "Thomas Kincaid" of Civil War art. http://www.mortkunstler.com/

The pic of Tiny and Baby is wondrous now as it was when you first took it. But then THEY were/are wondrous in and of themselves. The quality of a photograph is in direct proportion to the quality of the subject - Tiny and Baby never took a bad picture. Nor does Tiny and her suitor take bad pics now.

And while I'm no art expert, I am reasonably well educated and have fairly eclectic tastes that do not include Kinkade the sellout. I adore oriental art including ancient Japanese painting on rice paper and I have one Ben Shahn signed print that is my pride and joy. Why? Not because it's valuable or even goes with my decor but simply because it makes me feel good to look at it! That's MY criteria.

Egad I miss Baby (and Sam) a lot.

See, I think Kinkade's work is pleasant. It's the visual equivalent of instrumental soft rock; unobtrusive and easy enough to deal with when it stays in the background.

But does it excite? Does it evoke emotions? Eh, not so much.

KingShamus: One thing that makes my toes curl is background noise that's "unobtrusive." Drives me up a wall. Quiet, please. :D

Lovely post, and gorgeous kitties--good to see them again! I yawn over Kinkade. By contrast, I adore Norman Rockwell, another mass market artist. Better painters of light: Degas, Turner, El Greco, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Canetto, The Dutch Masters. For starters...

Retriever: I totally agree. Check out my Normal Rockwell post Obama: Freedom of speech? Who needs it?

"Because Rockwell's subject matter was usually on the corny side, serious art critics tended to look down upon the artist's accomplishment, but beyond the anecdotal component — much loved by the average American — his compositional and painterly skills were quite remarkable."

... a Cat-cum-Vermeer starring Tiny:

The universal within the commonplace

... and a few more Light reflections

Sissy, your sensitivity to the play of dark and light is one thing about your photos that influenced me to start adding photos to my blog. But I'm a rank amateur. Not up to considering form and light a whole lot just yet. Still at the stage of simple exuberance.

Aaahh, Mr. Kinkade. My thoughts on his mall-friendly "art" are already well-known to my Esteemed Readers.

Your photographs, on the other hand, glow with their own light. Please keep sharing them!

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