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June 19, 2008

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"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Therein lies the folly of mankind. Refusal to accept and understand human nature is the greatest weakness of our species.

And of course, for far too many Democrats, they deny the past ever happened! Selective amnesia or willful obfuscation? You decide.

Meanwhile, the exquisite Tiny warms the heart and relaxes the soul. I have to confess to a deep desire to pick her up and hold her close to my heart and just cuddle her until she's limp with pleasure - and she probably isn't even that kind of cat. But in the abstract, it sure is a lovely thought!

Ah flooding and the Mississippi... a perpetual dilemma it seems. 1993 is not that long ago - less than 20 years! Yet, much of the land that was completely underwater during that flood, has now been built up. Talk about forgetting...

My husband and I discussed this at length a few times (being as we have family living in the St. Louis area - although not the flood plains).

While for businesses it might make sense to build in these areas and simply take the risk of being flooded out - people buying homes there will most certainly be SOL when the flood waters hit. They'll lose a lot if not everything. I feel sorry for those who came from other areas and didn't know these were flood plains (it's not exactly evident during low water times!), but I don't feel sorry for those who grew up in the area and know where the water goes yet choose to build/buy there anyway.

It's not only the Mississippi - it's the Missouri and Meramec Rivers too. They surround the area and when the Mississippi backs up - they have no where to run off so it's a chain reaction.

The flooding is cyclical - everyone knows there are drought years and wet years. Yet the news media don't seem to understand this - thus you have the huge drama via television. I talked to my sister yesterday - so far the water level is 12 feet below the 1993 levels for the same time period.

Of course coming from this type of background - we now check before we buy a house on the surrounding area and how prone it might be to flooding.

My cousin, Nancy lives in Sioux City, IA in northwest Iowa and when I asked her how they were doing with the flooding in central Iowa she told me that they are fine and that central Iowa doesn't take care of their smaller rivers and too many people live near flood zones.

If I remember rightly, during the Civil War General Grant and his engineers attempted to change the course of the Mississippi River in order to bypass the fortifications at Vicksburg, Mississippi. Although it did not seem to work at the time, the constant force of the river at the point of Grant's excavations, over time eventually changed the course of the River. Today if you visit Vicksburg you will find that the river is no longer close to the city. Nature finished what Grant started.

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