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« Like a moth to a name | Main | When scientists "join in the political fray, where they really don't belong" »

September 08, 2007

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Happy Birthday, Grammy.

She's still a shining star, looking over your shoulder. I'm sure she always will be; you're lucky to have her.

Childhood memories are with us always. The lucky ones such as yourself have ones to cherish.

Ah - Goomp is right of course. Both of my grandmothers lived to age 99, both passed away in the early 1980's. I remember seeing my father's mother 2 times (although I know she came to visit when I was 2 years old, I don't remember that one). My mother's mother I saw 3 times a year (there abouts) but it was such a large family with so many grandchildren, I never spent much time with her.

Sounds like you had a chance to really get to know your grandma - that's a wonderful thing.

This post is rich in everything important. Grandmothers, beautiful girls, great movies. I was born on the same day as my grandmother's grandmother, Polly Miranda Mabry Stiles. That gives me a greater connection to her I think somehow. I know that she had a great deal of native American "Cherokee" blood because she lived until the photographic era. It's true, being young and pretty is wicked fun. But sometimes it's somewhat daunting.

How very fortunate to have the grandmother that you had, and the memories that were built through the years with her. She sounds like she was a remarkable and most courageous woman.

I never knew my maternal grandmother although by reputation and through the various tales told by her surviving children, I came to "know" her and love her in a very special way. She died when my own mother was 14 years old, in the way of my mother's family, at age 58 - as did most of my aunts and uncles and my own mother. She was a strong woman who, with my grandfather (who preceded her in death by 7 years), managed to raise her 9 living children to independence (my mother was the youngest and graduated from high school right after her mother's death), and my grandparents were even resourceful enough to provide my mother's eldest brother with a full college education.

Then I look at some of the namby-pamby, whiney characters that seem to abound in public life today and I miss the strength, courage and SPINE of your grandmother AND mine. Different breed entirely.

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