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« "There is something funny going on with the work in that tunnel" | Main | "To live with lies spun by regimes that were brutally clinging to power" »

July 12, 2006

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This again...

Cute pie graphic and all (maybe you could use a big smiley face?), but where we're talking about a site memorializing the horror of a mass murder committed in the name of Islam, I don't think it's over the top for people to be extra sensitive about a vaguely designed site that could be intrepreted as an Islamic crescent, esp. when its method of acknowledging the number of victims appeared to include the terrorists who perpetrated the act.

While we're (back) on the subject, what is up with this trend toward endless vagueness with modern monuments? Would it be so gauche to do something like the wall, or something with a simple sculpture that someone other than an art major could tell what it was trying to depict (beyond just looking kind of pretty)?

Actually, I think that the families of the dead should have the final say on what the memorial should look like. And, if it looks like a crescent to the rest of us, if they're okay with it, we need to respect their feelings.

Agreed - as long as the families of the dead are paying for it. If it's being funded through taxpayer dollars, then everyone gets a say.

i love the 'apple pie' image.

outstanding...

the reason and quality of your insight is tremendous.

thank you Ms. Willis...

I'm glad you mention the families, because they've unwittingly become part of the story of how the memorial went wrong.

One of the worst single aspects of the management of the memorial process has been the intention (from the beginning) to exclude visitors from the crash area and the woods behind.

Only family members are allowed there. IMO, that sop was how the Park Service got the families on side, and was done as a political move because the Park Service fears the moral authority the families might have in the public eye. I would be surprised if this requirement had entered the mind of a family member until the ever-political Park Service thought it up. If these government deciders had been around decades ago only family members would be able to stand above the Arizona.

It was an early sign of how the bureaucrats would be making choices to protect themselves from criticism. It explains much about how we ended up with a modernist, minimalist memorial design. And those twin pools and an irrelevant tower in NYC? Same themes, different place, all born of the same instinct to soothe that prevents showing the WTC jumpers.

It's no accident that these memorial designs set our history to slipping away. That's what the modernists have been doing to every aspect of life in Europe for decades, and the loss of national identity there is now nearly complete. The results, of course, are and will be catastrophic.

9/11 was the first disaster. The second, how afraid we have become of recognizing what actually happened, is a disaster to our culture and spirit. This is only America as long as we make sure it never stops being America.

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