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« "There's a kind of moral blackmail" | Main | Look, Ma, new lands! »

June 06, 2005

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Thank you for the interesting lesson in arboriculture. It may interest you to know that before the wood of dead trees was developed into fibres from which paper could made, old rags were beaten to a pulp to separate the fibres from which paper was be made.

I'm a huge fan of the plane trees, be they American sycamores or London Planes. I remember hearing somewhere that they are the largest (girthwise) trees on the East Coast of the US - don't know if that's true or not, but the two growing a couple blocks from my office (they look like London Planes) are sooo wide that I can't reach my arms around them when I feel the urge to give them hugs.

What a lucky garden you have to be visited upon by spiderwort. I've considered digging some up from an undeveloped lot nearby to my house, but figure that it volunteered to grow there and not in my yard. I don't want to interfere with its free will or anything.

More exquisite images and fascinating history. And sigh, that's yet another book for the list.

I revere my London Plane for the shade in our 100°+ summers and for the Autumn experience of wading around hip-deep in the yard looking for the cats.

Trees on city property are Pollarded and many homeowners do the same. I know the reasons but it sorta creeps me out. The trees look a bit like enormous old grape vines.

Interesting, Goomp. Thanks for the inside info. :)

Be: Native Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) "grows to a larger trunk diameter than any other native hardwoood," says The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees (1988), adding "The present champion's trunk is about 11' in diameter; an earlier giant's was nearly 15'. Re Spiderwort, if you don't want to take them from the wild, there are cultivated species -- Tradescantia x andersoniana -- in a range of flower colors from blue to purple to pink, white and red that might catch your fancy.

I agree with you, Mr. Kurtz, re the creepiness of pollarding trees like the Planes whose nature is to be large and spreading -- check out this link for creepy squared: http://www.kew.org/newviews/adventures/tree_beech2.shtml -- 'Love the mental image of looking for the cats hip-deep in leaf litter, and yes, Spongberg is wicked fun and interesting for both reading through and dipping into.

Looks rather like a Hogwarts tree.

Also, tangential to Spongberg; there was a mention on the tube last night of 50,000 exotic species of plants and animals in the US.

It won't be the "Religious Right" that takes over this country, but Kudzu and the Asian Carp. Out here it's Russian Thistle.

I remember hearing somewhere that they are the largest (girthwise) trees on the East Coast of the US - don't know if that's true or not, but the two growing a couple blocks from my office (they look like London Planes) are sooo wide that I can't reach my arms around them when I feel the urge to give them hugs.

It all goes to show that whether you're talkin' old-fashioned dead-tree books or the internet, the more sources the better.

Very helpful and interesting post, thank you

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